"Misery" is a Horror Masterpiece

3/17/2019

The novels of Stephen King have been made into several movies and TV shows with varying degrees of success and quality.  “Misery” is one of the good ones second only to “The Shawshank Redemption.”  “Misery” gathered together the best talent in all aspects and created a modern horror masterpiece.  

Kathy Bates’s role of Annie Wilkes won her the Best Actress Academy Award for 1991.  Her portrayal of an unhinged and delusional super fan of romance novelist Paul Sheldon was simply amazing and terrifying.  James Caan, who is usually cast as the tough guy, plays a sensitive writer who upon finishing his new novel crashes his car in the snowy Colorado Mountains.  This setting made me think of the “The Shining” another King masterpiece.  When Paul comes too, we hear Annie’s words echo “I’m your number one fan”.  Paul’s injuries leave him bedridden, but Annie, a former nurse, takes care of him.  She seems sweet and innocent wearing a gold cross around her neck, but her behavior gets increasingly erratic.  Upon reading Paul’s new manuscript and the fact that he has killed off Misery, the female heroine of his romance novels, Annie goes a little berserk.  She has Paul burn the pages and re-write “a better story”.  Paul needs to build up his strength and formulate a plan to get out.  He has Annie go to the store to get a certain kind of paper which allows him and his wheelchair to get out of his room and explore the house.  Although when she finds out this leads to one of the best and most cringe-inducing scenes of the film.  Annie Wilkes is one of the great female horror icons for which there are very few.  She is right up there with Mrs. Vorhees from “Friday the 13th”.  She is a very human and complex character who is extremely disturbed.  

Buster the local sheriff is an old-timer played by Richard Farnsworth.  He and his clerk/wife Virginia pretty much make up the police force of the small sleepy town.  They have some really nice scenes together, but when he goes to investigate the Wilkes house he is in for a few surprises.  It’s up to Paul to save himself and when Annie has reached the end of her rope its do or die.

The movie is about these two characters and the cat and mouse game they play.  Both actors turn in brilliant performances.  The script was written by the legendary William Goldman and directed by Rob Reiner.


"The Eyes of My Mother" is a Must See!

3/2/2019

The art house horror film has really flourished in the last few years with several filmmakers making really great films that hope to breathe new life into the often tired and overworked horror genre.  “The Eyes of My Mother” is the debut film from Nicholas Pesce and is a searing look into one woman's grief and loneliness.  The film is presented in black and white not as a cheap gimmick, but as the best way to tell this quiet, stark and stripped down story of its characters.

Set in a country farmhouse in about the 1950s or 60s a young girl named Francisca is fascinated by a butchered cows head, her mother an eye surgeon indulges in her daughter's curiosity.  Later while playing outside a drifter comes by the house and starts up a conversation with little Francisca.  The man looks to be in his twenties and is dressed like a bible salesman, but as they say, he don't look right.  Francisca’s mother comes out right away, the man then asks to use the bathroom and she reluctantly agrees.  The man is outright creepy and as one might think he is a psychotic killer, who drags the mother into the bathroom at gunpoint.  When Francisca’s father comes home, he finds the man in the bathroom with his dead wife.  Although Francisca is still alive she is deeply traumatized.  Instead of calling the police, they hand out their own form of justice and keep the man, who they call Charlie, chained up in the barn.  Flash forward about 10 years and Charlie has become this blinded feral beast and Francisca’s pet and only friend.  Her father is a very quiet and reserved man and when he finally dies it is the last straw in Francisca’s desperate life.

In some ways, this movie is a female version of Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho”.  Unable to deal with her father’s death she keeps his body and bathes it and sleeps with it.  She does make an effort to reach out to others as she goes to a bar one night and brings a woman back to her house but in short, time creeps the hell out of her.  As the woman tries to leave Francisca smacks he over the head.  We then see her putting little wrapped packages into the refrigerator.  This film can be subtle in its depiction of its nastiness, but also very overt when it wants to be.  Francisca is a very complex character with tremendous internal struggle.  Her fear of loneliness and abandonment has been eating away at her for years with no way to express herself.  In another attempt at intimacy, she unchains Charlie, bathes him and has sex with him.  She wakes up and finds him gone, she finds him staggering along in the fields outside the house.  She catches up with him and kills him.


Now is where the story gets even more disturbing.  She needs a new pet, so she hitches a ride from a young mother with a baby.  When they get to the farmhouse she asks to hold the baby and takes off with it.  The mother runs after her and into the house, where Francisca sets a trap and knocks her out.  She then blinds her and chains her up in the barn.  We flash forward again and the baby, Antonio, is now about five.  His is curious about what is in the barn and despite Francisca’s warning about going in there, he must investigate.  Although he is frightened, he shows love and compassion for this dirty long haired creature who is his real mother.  One night he leaves the barn door open and she escapes.  This is the downfall of Francisca and the end to her painful and tortured life that started at the hands of a mad man.  Although this is a very short film, about 75 minutes, it doesn’t waste a second in telling its sad and disturbing tale.