"The Witch" Casts a Spell of Terror!


 4/4/2018

“The Witch” is a painstakingly authentic look at a dark time in the New World called America.  This is an immigrant family’s tale of terror from 1630s New England.  Set before the infamous Salem Witch Trails a family of six has been banished from the safety of the plantation and forced to make it on their own.

William, Katherine and their four children Thomasin, Caleb, Twins Mercy and Jonas and baby Thomas settle on a small farm on the edge of the forest.  Day to day life is a struggle and when forces outside your control seem to be conspiring against you a desperate search for answers drives people to insane lengths. The dialogue in the film is of the period and taken from the actual journals of the people who lived in that time.  The atmosphere created by director Robert Eggers is amazing and together with the haunting score its adds to the many layers that make up the film.

This story belongs to Thomasin, a beautiful blonde teenage girl on the verge of womanhood.  In there very religious and very repressed society, the most dangerous and fearful thing imaginable is a young woman’s burgeoning sexuality and its effect on everybody else.  While playing and innocent game of peek-a-boo with baby Samuel, the baby suddenly disappears.  Although we the audience see what happens to Samuel, the family does not.  Numerous other strange happenings start occurring.  The crops wither and die, Caleb has impure thoughts of his sister.  The Mother exudes anger and jealousy over Thomasin’s youth and beauty.  The animals also take on a sinister appeal, none more than Black Phillip the goat.  This overarching feeling of doom and dread all seem to point to Thomasin.


When Caleb and Thomasin slip out to look for their baby brother, the horse gets spooked and the dog runs away.  Caleb goes after them but gets lost only to find the witch house.  Thomasin is found by her father, but Caleb doesn’t return until a day later and in some sort of trance, he’s been bewitched.  The family in physically and psychologically being torn apart leaving Katherine home sick for England.  Everyone gets swept up into hysteria leading to accusations of witchcraft.  Everyone turns on each other.  Katherine’s hallucinations are absolutely frightening as well as Caleb’s delirium right before he dies.  Everyone has their spirit shattered in horrific ways all ending up with Thomasin being that last one standing.  Eventually walking into the woods to join a coven of Witches dancing naked around a fire.  This “New England Folktale” is extremely well made and acted and seethes authenticity and fear.  


"The Autopsy of Jane Doe" is the Sleeper Horror Hit of 2017!


3/30/2018

Truly great Horror films are very hard to find these days.  Since they are relatively cheap to produce and proven money makers there is a lot out there.  Most of which are pure crap.  “The Autopsy of Jane Doe” is a rare treat, it’s engaging, suspenseful and well acted.  The absolute sleeper hit of 2017!

Veteran actor Brian Cox plays Tommy who with his son Austin, played by Emile Hirsh, run a generations old Mortuary and Crematorium business.  Both actors give grounded and realistic performances even when things a little crazy.  The perceived ages of the two characters seems a little off, but it’s a minor complaint in an otherwise believable duo.

The film opens with crime scene investigation and a mysterious young woman half buried in the cellar.  We then cut to our guys Tommy and Austin as we watch them perform an autopsy on a man who is burnt to a crisp.  The gory nasty bits are extremely well done.  They go about their business of cutting up the body weighting the organs and such.  Although they seem to have a good working relationship there is some tension between them.  When the work is done, we meet Austin’s girlfriend Emma.   Emma is exited and curious to see some dead bodies, while initially hesitant, the lockers are opened.  As a throwback to an earlier time one of the corpses has a bell tied to their toe.  This little item is used to great effect later on.   Austin and Emma’s plans for a night out are put on hold when the Sheriff rolls in the body of the Mystery woman.  Not wanting to leave his dad with all the work Austin goes back to help solve the mystery of the Jane Doe.

On the outside the woman’s body looks immaculate except for some dirt (or peat) under the nails.  Her insides however tell a much different story.  She looks to have been beaten and tortured.  Her lungs are black suggesting she died in a fire.  Although you get the hint of what she is and what’s really going on, the characters take their time and eventually come to the realization.  The film succeeds in its execution of the material and the portrayal of its characters.  Tommy and Austin are people we care for, they are our close friends.  They are not your typical horror stereotype douche bags whose only reason for being is to get sliced and diced.

When they’ve finally had enough weird shit happening to them they decide to leave.  With a raging thunderstorm going on outside, a large fallen tree has blocked their escape.  Needless to say things start get a little crazy and they guys must double their efforts in finding out who this Jane Doe really is.  The ending to all this mayhem is a little unsettling but does fits well within the whole mythology of the story.  It’s a fun late night movie that is a step above most other scary movies.


Take a Ride through the "Badlands" with Terrence Malick



 2/18/2018

“Badlands” was the debut film from American auteur Terrance Malick and brings us the story of lovers on the run.  Released in 1973 and starring Martin Sheen and Sissy Spacek, the film has its characters desperate for something else.  Loosely Based on the true story of Charles Starkweather, the teenage spree killer who tore a path through Nebraska and Wyoming in the late 1950s.  Along for the ride was his 14 year old girlfriend Caril Ann Fugate.

Holly is a lonely 15 year old girl in a small Texas town who lives with her dad.  He voice echoes throughout the film in voice over that is more than just narration but is like a diary of her thoughts and feeling about life.  While twirling her baton one afternoon in the front yard a young and muscular garbage collector starts up a conversation, this is Kit.  Kit is charismatic bad boy from the other side of the tracks with a strong resemblance to James Dean.  Kit is about 10 years older than Holly and their fast moving relationship has been kept from her father.  But when he finds out he takes it out on her dog by shooting it in the yard.  Kit pleads to him that he is a good man and that he means only the best, but this doesn’t work.  When things come to a head Kit gets violent and when trying to take Holly away he shoots him dead.  Holly seems rather indifferent to this.  It could be that she is in a state of shock cause she does slap Kit, but sees this as he chance for freedom.  They bury his body and set the house ablaze before hitting the dusty open road.


They hideout in the woods making treehouses and eating what they can find or steal.  When a group of bounty hunters come across their camp Kit is ready for them and kills all 3.  Holly is quick to defend him although does she really know what kind a person he really is?  They run to a friend of Kit’s and stay with him for a while until Kit’s paranoia gets the better of him and shoots him in the back when he thinks he is about to rat on them.  Kit and Holly hit the road once again but for Holly life on the run is still a life of solitude and loneliness.  She doesn’t take part in the killings but she is loyal to Kit.  They become a part of the landscape just like all of the other animals we see in the barren plains.  They make their own roads with no destination in mind.  Although they are both looking to be free, they end up creating their own prisons.  The law finally catches up with them in Montana.  He leaves Holly so she doesn’t get hurt and burns a path through the plains.  He seems to have out run the police but sabotages his own car, and allows himself to be caught.  He is polite and congenial to all of the law enforcement people.  He is so charismatic and likable that some of the cops even ask for his autograph.

This is one of the great films of the 70s and introduced the world to Terrance Malick.  His films are deeply meditative and in tune with the natural world and peoples involvement with it.  He later went on to direct the equally brilliant “Days of Heaven” in 1978.  Only then to take an astonishing 20 year break from filmmaking and reappearing with “The Thin Red Line” in 1998.  He has now been making films at a regular rate.  An artist and philosopher Malick is truly one of a kind. 

"Natural Born Killers" by Oliver Stone

2/15/2018

Controversial in its time Oliver Stone’s 1994 film “Natural Born Killers” was at the center of the long heated debate of whether media violence influences actual violence, especially in young people.  Similar to rock music and horror movie outrage in the 80s.  It’s just one of those issues that will never go away.  

This film is an all out assault on the senses, an acid trip down desert roads and small towns.  A sharply satirical look at the early 90’s when the “Talk Show” was king and tabloid journalism went to unimaginable lengths.  While inspired by the true story of Bonnie and Clyde and the Arthur Penn film, “Natural Born Killers” is pure fiction.  Here we have Mickey and Mallory Knox, a love crazed couple on a vicious killing spree and becoming tabloid and talk show mega stars in the process.  The film is shot completely in dutch angles giving every moment a jagged and uneasy feeling.  The editing is a cocaine fueled chop shop with almost 3,000 cuts.  Cutting in black and white footage, animation, different film stocks, you name it it’s in there.

Mickey, “the big bad wolf," is played by Woody Harrelson and is a revelation when compared to his previous persona of the meek country boy Woody Boyd in the popular T.V. show “Cheers”.  Mallory is played by the little known actress Juliette Lewis.  While looking like a young Patti Smith, she matches Harrelson’s crazy intensity.  A pre-drug rehab Robert Downy Jr. plays Wayne Gale, a self righteous Geraldo Rivera like television journalist who will do anything to get the story, no matter how many people he hurts along the way.  On the hunt for Mickey and Mallory is an equally twisted Detective Jack Scagnetti (Tom Sizemore), while being and author himself he falls for the media hype surrounding the couple.  Comedian Rodney Dangerfield also goes against type as Mallory’s abusive father, while brief his scenes are pretty amazing.


At about the mid point of the film Mickey and Mallory run into a Native American man who can see them for who they are.  He is the only selfless and kind character in the whole film.  Around the fire he puts them into a nightmarish trance where they relive the abuse inflicted upon them by their parents.  Mickey is jolted awake only to shoot the native man as a reflex.  As they leave this is the only time he feels real regret for what they’ve done.  Outside they become surround by an army of rattle snakes and are bitten numerous times.  Life on the run is about to come to an end in the parking of a pharmacy where they try to get the “snake juice”.  Separated and taken to prison they come under the eye of Warden Wurlitzer, played by Tommy Lee Jones.  Just like all the other characters, the warden is an extremely intense looking dude like he is 2 seconds from massive heart attack.  However the warden allows Wayne Gale a special post Super Bowl live interview with Mickey himself.  This is the just the moment needed to light a fuse and bring down the whole establishment.  While trying to figure out why Mickey is the way he is we come to a tipping point.  “I guess I’m just a Natural Born Killer” (Hey, that’s the title of the film) after those words a prison riot erupts and an orgy of anger, violence and mayhem is released.  Mickey and Mallory escape and our heroes/mass murderers are free and their newest super fan Wayne Gale is along for the ride.  Until they make an example of him being the worst kind of person.  The epitome of what is wrong with modern society.  He begs for him life and that he needs to survive to tell their tale.  They point to the running camera and his life is ended.


Does this film glamorize violence and manipulate young minds into deviant life choice? Does music?  Does the daily news?

Take the Trip with "Bonnie and Clyde"

2/7/2017

“Bonnie and Clyde” was released in 1967 and based on the true story of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow whose depression era crime spree is one of the most infamous in American History.  Starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway this film is a true classic.  The film was released in a time when the country was going through some tough times both socially and politically.  The films depiction of on screen violence was quite the landmark in that it set the tone for films to come.  The filmmakers don’t just  show the violence, but the consequences of it as well.  It depicts Bonnie and Clyde as heroes even as they rob banks and murder police officers.  They were also decades ahead of their time as they were some of the first media superstars.  They were proud of what they were doing and told people “We rob banks”.  They took pictures of themselves holding guns and looking tough, especially Bonnie with a cigar in her mouth and a gun on her hip.  Bonnie was a lonely and bored small town waitress with no hopes for the future, while Clyde was an ex-con with a talent for stealing cars.  They were the perfect match and fell in love almost immediately.  The film is so many things it’s a love story, a road movie, a crime drama and even funny at times.

The themes of personal freedom, rebelling against authority, and strong women fit in perfectly with the ideals of the 1960s.  Bonnie and Clyde end up forming the Barrow Gang which included his brother Buck and his wife Blanche and C. W.  Moss a young gas station attendant who is good at driving and fixing cars.  During a bank robbery while the gang gathers up all the money, Clyde asks an old man in overalls if “That’s his money or the banks?” “Its mine” he says and Clyde lets him keep it.  Clyde is not out to harm and steal from the good blue collar working man, but the establishment itself.  I think he sees himself as a sort of vigilante against the oppressive government. 

While the film is light on music and quiet in some dramatic moments, there are several scenes with a loud banjo playing.  It just doesn’t seem to fit.  It’s probably put in for a light hearted and comedic tone, but I found it quite distracting.  The editing was also a little off putting at times.  When Bonnie and Clyde are hiding out and in bed together Clyde proclaims again that he is no lover boy and gets up frustrated, the cuts are rather disorienting.  I get what the directors wants to communicate, but I just think it looks bad and sloppy.  There were also a few scenes that looked way too melodramatic and overacted.  The actress Estelle Parson who plays Blanche actually won an Academy Award for her role which I thought was way over the top and actually annoying at times.


As I mentioned previously the violence is quite brutal and realistic for the time.  There are a number of shoot outs with the cops and in the last one Buck is shot in the face, but staggers around in a bloody mess for the next few scenes before finally dying.  Both Bonnie and Clyde get shot in the arm and Blanche gets glass in her eyes.  But the ultimate scene is when Bonnie and Clyde finally reach the end of their crime spree and are taken out in a hale of gunfire. I really liked this film and can see why people call it a classic and although its 50 years old it still holds up as an entertaining an engaging film.